Mathematics Bachelor of Science
Department of Mathematics
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OVERVIEW OF MAJOR
Do you enjoy the challenges of solving mathematical puzzles and analyzing complex formulas? Do people typically ask you to help solve mathematical problems because you are good with numbers? Are you good at organizing and analyzing information? Does the idea of calculating odds and probabilities fascinate you? Would you like to apply mathematics and mathematical modeling to the solution of engineering, planning, or risk management problems? Do you want to teach mathematics to junior high, high school, or college students? If you answer “yes” to any of these questions, then you may want to consider a major in mathematics.

Mathematics is the science of numbers, shapes, probabilities, and measurements. It is a universal language in which information is stated in its simplest possible form. Mathematics has a dual nature--it is an independent field of study valued for its precision of thought and elegance, and it is an important source of techniques and methods increasingly applied to a variety of problems in a wide array of disciplines. For example, mathematical modeling and simulation is used to provide answers, faster and less expensively, than with tests performed on scale models.

The undergraduate program provides a liberal arts and practical education. The liberal arts component requires students to acquire a broad background in communication skills, humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. The major core focuses on developing students’ understanding and appreciation of the mathematical sciences, their problem solving skills, and ability to combine knowledge and skills in productive ways. Core subjects include three semesters of calculus, matrices and linear equations, advanced calculus of one variable, abstract algebra, linear algebra, computer programming, and statistics. The Department of Mathematics offers seven concentrations from which to choose: mathematics of information, general mathematics, actuarial science, applied mathematics, computational mathematics, statistics, and mathematics education.

General mathematics is a liberal arts program designed to provide a solid foundation in mathematics with the flexibility to explore and develop expertise in other academic fields. Because of its flexibility, this concentration is well suited for students who want to combine mathematics with such fields as business, law, computer science, or statistics.

Mathematics education is designed to prepare students for a secondary teaching certificate in mathematics and for the study and development of educational theory and techniques. Students take a strong mathematics core, including the proofs-oriented course in advanced calculus required in the other concentrations.

The applied mathematics concentration prepares students for careers as applied mathematicians working in business, government, and industry; therefore, it is recommended that students supplement their core program in the chosen area that their skills will be used, such as engineering, public health, finance, electronics, geology, etc. Course requirements emphasize mathematical foundations, applicable mathematics, and application of mathematics to other areas. Students receive training in numerical analysis, mathematical modeling and computing, as well as a solid preparation for further study.

Mathematics of information prepares students for graduate study and/or an interdisciplinary career in information/communication technology where mathematics, computer science and electrical engineering are interwoven. Students in this concentration receive training in cryptlogy, both source and channel coding theory, related courses in the companion fields, as well as the other core science and mathematics courses.

The computational concentration prepares students both for graduate work in mathematics and careers in industry. It is similar to the Applied Mathematics concentration; however, course work in this concentration emphasizes the use of numerical methods in applied mathematics.

The actuarial science concentration trains students how to use mathematics, statistics, business, and economics to analyze and plan for future situations involving financial uncertainties and risks. This concentration is designed to qualify students to take the first two examinations administered by the Society of Actuaries and lay the foundation for the remaining examinations.

The mathematics of information concentration prepares students for graduate study and/or an interdisciplinary career in information/communication technology where mathematics, computer science and electrical engineering are interwoven. Students in this concentration receive training in cryptlogy, both source and channel coding theory, related courses in the companion fields, as well as the other core science and mathematics courses.

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CHARACTERISTICS AND SKILLS
* A strong interest and aptitude for mathematics
* Quantitative and analytical skills
* Methodical and accurate in nature
* Strong problem solving ability
* Strong reasoning and abstract thinking ability
* Ability to concentrate for extended periods of time
* Inquisitive, curious and innovative
* Flexible, patient, and persevering
* Good communications and listening skills
* Attention to detail
* Critical thinking skills
* Organizational skills
* Ability to work independently or in a team
* Abstract thinking and reasoning ability
* Fast in working with numbers

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POTENTIAL CAREER OPTIONS
The Mathematics major prepares students for a wide variety of occupations in business, industry, government, and education. Although there is no longer a national shortage of mathematics teachers, our math education graduates have been successful in finding positions. Actuarial Science graduates who have passed the first two professional actuary exams can expect to find positions in large metropolitan areas with good entry-level salaries. Applied math graduates continue to find employment opportunities in government and private industry. The demand for statisticians is currently high and is growing. Many pursue advanced degrees in mathematics, statistics, computational science or engineering. Participation in internships, volunteer activities, or cooperative education opportunities is highly recommended to enhance your practical training and development. Graduates who go on for advanced studies can attain more responsible positions with the possibility of rising to top professional levels. Career occupations include but are not limited to:
* Applied mathematician
* Actuary
* Engineer
* Statistician
* Financial analyst/adviser
* Computer programmer; Computer systems analyst
* Mortgage officer; Market analyst
* Accountant; Tax auditor
* Risk analyst
* Math educator

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RELATED STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
* Actuary Club
* Engineering Club
* Society of Women Engineers
* Society of Black Engineers and Scientists
* Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
* Accounting Club
* Finance Club

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MORE INFORMATION
Department of Mathematics
101 Weber Bldg
1874 Campus Delivery
Colorado State University
Fort Collins, CO 80523-1874
970-491-1303
http://www.math.colostate.edu/
* Academic and career advising for majors


Center for Advising and Student Achievement (CASA)
TILT Building
801 Oval Drive
Colorado State University
Fort Collins, CO 80523-1033
970-491-7095
http://www.casa.colostate.edu
* Academic advising/Major exploration


Career Center
120 Lory Student Center
Fort Collins, CO 80523
970-491-5707
http://career.colostate.edu/
* Major and career exploration/Job search information


Admissions and Undergraduate Recruitment
Ammons Hall
711 Oval Drive
Colorado State University
Fort Collins, CO 80523
970-491-6909
http://www.admissions.colostate.edu
* Admission applications/University visits and tours


General Catalog Online
http://www.catalog.colostate.edu/

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